Archive for the ‘Pop culture’ Category

Taking a dark ride

July 21, 2017

Today’s Zippy brings on scary clowns in Laff in the Dark tunnels:

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— and, worse, threatens to unleash Tom Cruise (and his Outsider Art).

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Wonder Woman gets Milk Duds at the Charcoal Pit

July 14, 2017

In today’s Zippy, Bert and Bob talk movies at the Charcoal Pit:

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The topic is the new movie Wonder Woman, the candy Milk Duds comes up in passing, and the locale is the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington DE.

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Getting the comic

July 3, 2017

Yesterday, from Chris Hansen, this cartoon by Daniel Beyer:

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Chris’s comment:

It took me a minute to “get” it (I’ve been in England for a looooong time)

(Chris is an American long resident in England.)

Another exercise in understanding comics. In this case, requiring a crucial piece of knowledge about American popular culture.

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Typo time

June 23, 2017

In writing yesterday’s posting on MLB Pride logos, I intended to type the name Aric Olnes, but anticipated the S at the end of Olnes in typing Aric, and so typed

Aris Olnes

A very common sort of typo, in this case creating the name of a hermaphoditic deity of war,

Aris = Ares (Greek god of war) + Eris (Greek goddess of discord)

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missing it

May 13, 2017

Yesterday’s Mother Goose and Grimm:

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Ok, a simple ambiguity. The relevant subsenses of the transitive verb miss, from NOAD2, with my sense id codes:

— in the set of 12 failure-miss senses:
[1f] fail to attend, participate in, or watch (something one is expected to do or habitually does): teachers were supposed to report those students who missed class that day. [Mother Goose’s sense]

— in the set of 3 absence-miss senses:
[2c] feel regret or sadness at no longer being able to go to, do, or have: I still miss France and I wish I could go back. [Grimm’s sense, a willful misunderstanding of Mother Goose]

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Like a mayfly

May 1, 2017

Today’s Bizarro:

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(If you’re puzzled by the odd symbols in the cartoon — Dan Piraro says there are 3 in this strip — see this Page.)

Appropriately for May Day, this strip is ephemeral: this month, if you keep up with popular culture, it’s wryly funny, but a year from now, almost no one will understand it. (Yes, I’m going to explain it.)

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A primate with a pipe

April 10, 2017

Yesterday’s Bizarro is yet another Ascent of Man evolution cartoon, but this time a guy intervenes at the ape stage to offer a stupid outfit to wear and a pipe to pretend to smoke:

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This is an allusion to the (venerable) meme of monkeys or apes (usually chimpanzees) dressed as people — akin to popular art showing dogs playing cards, or folk museums with stuffed frogs engaged in folksy activities. But with the extra kick that monkeys and apes are uncannily similar to people — in a very common view, especially similar to black Africans and those of black African descent in other parts of the world. The pipe isn’t a necessary component of the dressed-ip primate figure, but it’s a very common one.

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Body works

March 5, 2017

(Frank talk about the male body, but no sex in this particular posting. Use your judgment.)

Four body items that have come my way recently: bouncing penises and testicles (and other intimate views of the body) in a new computer game; mussels as vaginal symbols; axillary delights; and anal art.

This is Part I: Dangly Bits.

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Name fame

March 3, 2017

Still going back in my blog queue, now to a 12/15/16 NYT piece by Sam Roberts, (in print) “Increasingly, Surnames Are Latino, Census Says” and (on-line) “Hispanic Surnames on the Rise in U.S. as Immigration Surges”:

Taylor and Thomas are out. Lopez and Gonzalez are in. Six of the 15 most common surnames in the United States were of Hispanic origin in 2010, compared with four of 15 in 2000 and none as recently as 1990.

Smith, Johnson, Williams, Brown and Jones still remain the most common of 6.3 million last names reported in 2010, according to a Census Bureau analysis released on Thursday, but Garcia had edged up from eighth to sixth, closing in on Jones and Brown. (Rounding out the Top 10 were Miller and Davis.)

The ascendancy of the Hispanic names reflects both the surge of immigrants from Latin America over the last several decades and the fact that Hispanic surnames tend to be less diverse (a disproportionate 16 percent of Hispanic people have one of the top 10 Hispanic names).

Garcia and Rodriguez were joined in the Top 10 in 2010 by Martinez (the 15 most popular also include Hernandez).

“I hope it means that more people named Gonzalez and Garcia and Hernandez become civic leaders and teachers and become the future of America,” said Eric Gonzalez, the acting Brooklyn district attorney.

Most of the surnames increasing fastest among the highest-ranking 1,000 are Asian (Zhang was up 111 percent, followed by Li, Ali, Liu and Khan) and three of the 15 fastest growing were Hispanic (led by Vazquez, which was up 63 percent, followed by Bautista and Velazquez).

Among those 15, Patel proliferated by 58 percent, and also by the most numerically, nearly 250,000.[The name Patel is primarily from Gujarat, but there are also Patels from surrounding areas.]

Summary of the data:

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To welcome the name Lopez to the #12 slot (in 2010, remember), here are two Lopezes from pop culture: Jennifer and George:

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Jennifer Lynn Lopez (born July 24, 1969), also known as JLo, is an American singer, actress, dancer, fashion designer, author, and producer. (link)

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George Lopez (born April 23, 1961) is an American comedian and actor. He is known for starring in his self-produced ABC sitcom George Lopez. His stand-up comedy examines race and ethnic relations, including Mexican American culture. (link)

dying

February 17, 2017

Today’s Zippy:

On Henny Youngman and his famous one-liner “Take my wife … please”, see the Youngman section of this 9/8/12 posting.

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