Archive for the ‘Morning names’ Category

Jessica Dragonette in the morning

April 8, 2018

My morning name on the 6th: Jessica Dragonette. Why her name came up, I have no clue. A photo from her heyday:

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Morning name: Harry

April 3, 2018

My morning name a while back was just Harry. Some possibiities:

Dirty Harry. The Trouble With Harry. Harry Truman. Harry Hamblin. Prince Harry. Harry Houdini. Harry Potter. Harry Reems. Harry Connick Jr. Harry the Horse. Harry Frankfurt. Harry Belafonte.

But none of these. I instantly connected to Harry B. Miller, Jr., my first cousin-in-law. And then discovered that he’d died back in 2013.

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Saturday Night and Sunday Morning

April 2, 2018

Yesterday was Sunday, and the morning name for the day was, appropriately, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (the movie, and the book on which it was based):

(#1)

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Secretive morning name

March 29, 2018

That would be sebum, which led me almost immediately to semen and smegma: /s/-initial disyllables with accent on the first syllable that refer to bodily secretions.

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Vronsky & Babin in the morning

February 20, 2018

Yesterday morning, up and brushing my teeth, the name Vronsky & Babin came to me unbidden. At first I thought Vronsky must be the Count Vronsky of Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, but I was baffled by Babin (some transformation of the writer Isaac Babel?), and in any case the pairing sounded vaguely familiar. I went to the computer and discovered that V&B were indeed familiar, though I don’t think I’d heard about them for decades: a great duo-piano team of the last century.

But why had their names popped into my head? There turned out to be a clear answer, involving intricacies of memory and the unconscious.

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Morning millionaire

February 17, 2018

My morning name from a few days ago: John Beresford Tipton, the tv millionaire. (more…)

Epiphany morning with Joey Tribbiani

January 7, 2018

Since my middle name is Melchior, I was hoping for gold on Epiphany morning, but what I got was a primo sex dream — my attempts at programming sex dreams never work, they always turn into convoluted dreams about linguistic analyses, so yesterday’s dream was a great gift — featuring Joey Tribbiani as a fabulously slutty (also sweet and goofy) gay pornstar. Not Matt LeBlanc, but his character Joey Tribbiani. So I woke with a hunky funny Joey on my, um, mind.


(#1) Joey practices making love with a pineapple (video here)

That’s Matt LeBlanc playing Joey. My dream had Joey playing a stud named Rocco. In a threesome with me and my boyfriend, whose dream name I don’t remember, but he was played by my guy Jacques. Together, between nearly non-stop bouts of noisy public sex, we saved all the gay pornstars of the world from annihilation by an evil army. With the help of a lot of undercover agents, most of them women. But the three of us studs had the big weapons.

It was all deeply satisfying, with victories in battle and ragingly hot sex. Also a lot of fun, with horseplay and banter, and (thankfully) without the Friends laugh track. Also without the Epiphany gold befitting the white-bearded King of Persia, but then you can’t have everything.

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Morning tetrameter naming

December 27, 2017

The morning began with:

Xenophon Bellerophon

Two Ancient Greek names — the philosopher, historian, and soldier Xenophon and the mythical hero Bellerophon — together making a line of trochaic tetrameter (when the secondary accents on phon are treated as accented in the poetic line).

As a linguist, I had hoped that the phon in these names would be the Greek ‘sound’ stem, so that Xenophon would be equivalent to an English noun xenophone, referring either to someone who speaks a foreign language (parallel to Anglophone and  Francophone) or to a non-native sound, from a foreign language (like the voiceless velar fricative [x] in relatively German-faithful pronunciations of the noun Bach in English).

But apparently not (though the etymologies of the names seem to be uncertain). My hopes are dashed.

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sharp, sour

November 8, 2017

My morning name from a few weeks ago was the technical term oxytone. From NOAD2:

adj. oxytone: (especially in ancient Greek) having an acute accent on the last syllable.

with an etymology < Gk. ὀξύτονος, oxýtonos, ‘sharp-sounding’. with the first of our ‘sharp’ elements in modern English: OXY, oxy– (from Greek) or oxi– (from Latin).

As a prosodic term in Greek, it’s part of the set:

oxytone – paroxytone – proparoxytone

corresponding to the more familiar Latin terms:

ultimate – penultimate – antepenultimate

— that is,

final, last – next to last, second from the end – third from the end

OXY is familiar from the rhetorical term oxymoron < Gk. ὀξύς oksús ‘sharp, keen, pointed’ + μωρός mōros ‘dull, stupid, foolish’ — as it were, ‘sharp-dull’, referring to apparently contradictory combinations of expressions.

But wait, there’s more!

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The X-Bulbs, plus Greek Sword

October 27, 2017

It started a while back with a pair of morning names: Ixia and Sparaxis. Two showy bulbs, united by the letter X. They led to (in alphabetical order) ChionodoxaCyanixia, Hesperoxiphon, Ixiolirion, Oxalis, Xenoscapa. And from Hesperoxiphon, through its sword-bearing component (Gk. xiphos ‘sword’), to Xiphion, which we know now in its Latin version Gladiolus.

Along the way, some reflections on categorization and labeling in the plant world.

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