Archive for the ‘Homosexuality’ Category

Kind Hearts and Coronets

November 30, 2019

Or, Art and Artifice

In the most recent New Yorker (the 12/2/19 issue), a review by Anthony Lane of the 1949 film Kind Hearts and Coronets, in a new print, now showing in NYC. Lane’s last paragraph:

If you are unfamiliar with “Kind Hearts and Coronets,” the question is not whether making the trip to Film Forum [209 W. Houston St. in Greenwich Vilage, showings of KH&C 11/27 through 12/5] to see it is worth your while. The question is how stiff a penalty should be levied upon you by the City of New York should you fail to do so. My personal view is that a brief prison sentence would not be too harsh. There really is no excuse.

Anthony Lane has spoken; listen to the man. (Sadly, I have had to resign myself to watching a DVD of an earlier print.)

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All thanks to HomoEros

November 28, 2019

(This posting is about homoeroticism — for Thanksgiving, but still — and though the language isn’t raunchy, I’ll be writing about men’s bodies and mansex, and that isn’t suitable for kids or the sexually modest.)

Just when I’d fallen to musing that the net was bringing me nothing fresh from the bounty of its homoerotic resources to be thankful for this Thanksgiving — both men’s premium underwear companies that traffic in borderline-hardcore images in their ads and also gay porn companies that offer every manner of flat-out celebratory mansex in theirs were doing replays of their best hot stuff from past years, all of which I’d already posted about here — just then, Lucas Entertainment (high-end gay porn guys) came up with a totally new hot item, released just three days ago, for its Black Friday sale; and almost at the same time, Tim Evanson posted to Facebook with J. C. Leyendecker’s cover for the Saturday Evening Post for Thanksgiving 1928, framed as a bit of history-clash humor (Puritan soldier, weapon on his shoulder, and a modern warrior, a college football player in a holiday game, confront each other aggressively) but also giving off a cascade of homoerotic undertones.

Both the Leyendecker cover (below) and one of the ads (also below) for Lucas’s Barebacking in Public — in which (according to the publicity) “Dan Saxon pounds Gabriel Phoenix on Fire Island”, before they go on to flip roles — turn crucially on the intense content of the men’s facial expressions. These are gifts.

All thanks to HomoEros, who rules the domain of intimate connection, affectional and sexual, between men, and has granted us these gifts.

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Dancing against homophobia

November 27, 2019

(Not about language, unless a sprinkling of French counts. Instead, cute guys dancing acrobatically and affectionately with one another.)

Today’s touching bulletin from the quartier français of Homotopia: a performance that is all at once hot, sweet, tender, and earnest, to benefit the fight against homophobia, on the French reality tv show La France a un incroyable talent. An introductory shot of Guillaume (on the left) and Arthur (on the right):


(#1) “Une magnifique prestation pour la lutte contre l’homophobie” par les danseurs-acrobates Guillaume et Arthur

You can watch the performance here (set to Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah”).

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A regular festival of ambiguity

November 20, 2019

(Later in this posting there are a couple of raunchy men’s underwear ads, and some cautiously worded references to men’s bodies and mansex, so some readers might want to exercise caution.)

Ruthie and Joe in the One Big Happy from 10/9:

(#1)

Three senses of (ir)regular in just four panels. All traceable ultimately to the Latin noun regula ‘rule’, with rule understood as in NOAD:

noun rule: 1 [a] one of a set of explicit or understood regulations or principles governing conduct within a particular activity or sphere: the rules of the game were understood. [b] a principle that operates within a particular sphere of knowledge, describing or prescribing what is possible or allowable: the rules of grammar. …

The range of senses of regular is impressively large, and illustrates a whole variety of mechanisms of semantic change; the three senses above are a microcosm of this greater world.

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A hell of a queen

November 17, 2019

From my 11/17/18 posting (exactly a year ago) “Teddy Bears’ Picnic Day”, with this Bizarro cartoon:

(#1)

I was moved to declare November 17th Teddy Bear Picnic Day …, but it turns out that (by whatever obscure mechanism these things happen) July 10th is already taken for this occasion … [however:] Elizabeth acceded to the English throne on November 17th, 1558, so that today is unquestionably Elizabeth I Accession Day. From a Princeton Triangle Club show from a great many decades ago, the anthem for today:

I’m Elizabeth the First / Say it if you durst / I’m a hell of a queen!

I’m now thinking of (Elizabeth’s) Accession Day as Hell of a Queen Day — a much more versatile concept.

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Chart pie

November 14, 2019

The Wayno/Piraro Bizarro collabo from the 9th:


(#1) If you’re puzzled by the odd symbols in the cartoon — Dan Piraro says there are 2 in this strip — see this Page. Meanwhile, the pie segments run through the flavors in the order named, clockwise from the pumpkin segment at the top.

Transpositional wordplay of an especially simple sort, involving a two-word expression, with X Y ~ Y X — in this case taking off from a conventional N + N compound, the metaphorical  pie chart ‘chart resembling a pie’, and reversing the parts to yield the novel, and entertaining, (also metaphorical) compound chart pie ‘pie resembling a chart’.

The model expression pie chart refers to an object familiar in our culture, while the play expression chart pie refers to something novel and surprising: a pie made up of segments drawn from various different pies. Not a combination or mixed pie, like the familiar strawberry rhurbarb pie — a kind of hybrid pie — but instead a composite (‘made up of various parts or elements’ (NOAD) or chimerical pie, with distinct parts taken from different pies. (On chimeras, see my 11/13 posting “The chimera of Faneuil Hall”.)

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Butch cooks with a little butch truck

November 7, 2019

From Jeff Shaumeyer on Facebook on 11/3, this cookbook find — the butch cook book, by Lee Lynch, Nel Ward, & Sue Hardesty (Perfect Paperback, 2008) — at his favorite local thrift store, which moved him to wonder whether anyone still uses butch as a noun:


(#1) Adventures in cooking and in the language of sexuality: the title is intended to be read as ‘cook book for butches’ (rather than ‘cook book which is butch’) (JS’s phoro)

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Gaysper

November 2, 2019

The logo appeared last spring, but it’s especially appropriate for the Day of the Dead, yesterday:


(#1) Gaysper (as he was quickly dubbed), the gay ghost: a Casperesque wraith in rainbow

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Bears in the woods

November 1, 2019

Today’s Wayno/Piraro wordless Bizarro collabo (titled “Confirmed” by Wayno), on one of the two pop-culturally celebrated activities of bears in the woods (picknicking being the other one):


(#1) (If you’re puzzled by the odd symbols in the cartoon — Dan Piraro says there are 3 in this strip — see this Page.)

According to this cartoon, bears do indeed, as the idiom has it, shit in the woods, but not indiscriminately. Instead, there are designated defecation sites, alongside those facilities — gender-marked portable toilets — specifically for people to shit in the woods; the ones for bears, however, are open-defecation sites (in Bizarro-World, at least).

As it happens, bears have often been cartooned in the woods, especially when bent on defecation; the idiom, both wry and dirty, is irresistibly attractive to humorists.

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OUTiL: a historical note

October 23, 2019

For LGBT History Month, some notes on a little piece of that history in linguistics, in the loose network of academic acquaintanceship that formed at the Linguistic Institute at UC Santa Cruz in the summer of 1991: OUT in Linguistics, OUTiL, OUTIL (the abbreviation pronounced /áwtǝl/, through some wags joked about its being French outil /uti/ ‘tool’, with the expected sexual slang use). A notice went out on the Institute mailing list for an informal social gathering of the new group, with a characterization that then varied, from occasion to occasion, in its list of invitees; a version from several years later:

The group is open to lesbian, gay, bisexual, dyke, queer, homosexual, trans, etc. linguists and their friends. The only requirement is that you be willing to be out to everyone on the list as lgbt(-friendly); it’s sort of like wearing a pink triangle.

This was at a Linguistic Institute, so no one was fussy about who counted as a linguist; if you wanted to hang out with rest of us for the summer, you were welcome. Just so with OUTiL; if you wanted to hang out with the rest of us for an hour or two, you were welcome. OUTiL, however, was primarily social, and that was an excellent thing, especially at the time.

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