Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

An outrageous but colorful pun

March 22, 2017

xkcd 1814 Color Pattern:

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As it turns out, “That’s Amore” has a history on this blog, but this is a new direction.

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The (groan) burgers of Calais

March 13, 2017

Caught during a Prairie Home Companion re-run on the radio yesterday: a joke set-up for the burgers of Calais (referring to hamburgers), punning on Rodin’s The Burghers of Calais (his extraordinary bronze sculpture).

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Katharina Zwicky

March 10, 2017

Yet another Zwicky artist: Katharina, who signs herself as Katty. From her site:

I am pleased to announce the launch of my new Art & Photography portfolio web site KatharinaZwicky.com showcasing Illustration, Maps, Paper, Stationary & Art for Children.

The site also charts my endeavours on the MA Artist Teachers (MAAT) at Goldsmiths.

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No whey in hell

March 6, 2017

On Pinterest this morning, along with a bunch of Gary Larson cartoons, this cartoon by Dan Thompson from some time ago:

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Ingredients: “Little Miss Muffet”; homophony (or near-homophony) of whey and way; the complex AmE idiom no way in hell. Bonus: Anne Taintor.

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Bruce Nauman

March 6, 2017

(Various sex acts playfully portrayed in neon, but still…)

The last of yesterday’s four “Body works” postings (about San Francisco artist Keith Boadwee) ends with a discussion of Bruce Nauman’s neon sculpture Eat War (1986), echoed in Boadwee’s photo composition Eat Shit. And so to the incredibly multifaceted (and very often unsettling) artist Nauman, who is, among other things, a playful language artist and a chronicler of human connection, especially through sex.

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Body works, Part IV: Anal Art

March 5, 2017

(About art, but since it’s about Keith Boadwee, with a lot of male bodyparts and studied outrageousness. Not for kids or the sexually modest.)

On the 3rd, a piece about dancers performing with laser cartridges up their butts — a defiant and entertaining artistic move — prompted Aric Olnes to remind me about San Francisco artist Keith Boadwee and his brand of playful (and also deeply serious) in-your-face, up-my-butt art.

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Body works

March 5, 2017

(Frank talk about the male body, but no sex in this particular posting. Use your judgment.)

Four body items that have come my way recently: bouncing penises and testicles (and other intimate views of the body) in a new computer game; mussels as vaginal symbols; axillary delights; and anal art.

This is Part I: Dangly Bits.

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At the art museum

March 4, 2017

In collecting material for blog postings on recent exhibitions at the Cantor/Anderson galleries at Stanford, I came across a staff page with an excellent photo of Matthew Tiews, Associate Vice President for the Arts at Stanford:

I first knew Matthew as the Associate Director of the Stanford Humanities Center, a position that calls for a serious scholar who is generally knowledgeable about the humanities, social sciences, and the arts, and is also an able administrator, good at working with people, and (very important) with a solid sense of humor. Now Matthew oversees the arts programs and the arts complex at Stanford, which has developed into an entire campus neighborhood, or zone (three museums, a very spiffy concert hall, and more).

So I wrote Matthew about my Stanford art museum postings (which I thought might interest his staff), and now I’m reporting all this to you.

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He’s dancing with a laser up his butt

March 3, 2017

(The title above and #1 below should clue you in on whether this posting is for you.)

Today’s remarkable find: a piece on the thump site on the 1st, “This Dance Troupe Performs with Lasers in Their Butts” by Ali Gitlow:

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Young Boy Dancing Group at “The Curves of the World”, curated by Mette Woller, Chart Art Fair, Copenhagen, 2016 (photo by David Stjernholm)

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Abstraction and the Movies

March 3, 2017

The title of an exhibition at the Anderson Collection at Stanford, which, in the gallery’s release, “pairs and compares movies and paintings from the early to mid-twentieth century”. A substantial number of pairings, sprinkled throughout the Abstract Expressionism section of the museum, among other paintings from the artistic movement, broadly understood. Also from the gallery’s release, one example:

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