Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Kind Hearts and Coronets

November 30, 2019

Or, Art and Artifice

In the most recent New Yorker (the 12/2/19 issue), a review by Anthony Lane of the 1949 film Kind Hearts and Coronets, in a new print, now showing in NYC. Lane’s last paragraph:

If you are unfamiliar with “Kind Hearts and Coronets,” the question is not whether making the trip to Film Forum [209 W. Houston St. in Greenwich Vilage, showings of KH&C 11/27 through 12/5] to see it is worth your while. The question is how stiff a penalty should be levied upon you by the City of New York should you fail to do so. My personal view is that a brief prison sentence would not be too harsh. There really is no excuse.

Anthony Lane has spoken; listen to the man. (Sadly, I have had to resign myself to watching a DVD of an earlier print.)

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All thanks to HomoEros

November 28, 2019

(This posting is about homoeroticism — for Thanksgiving, but still — and though the language isn’t raunchy, I’ll be writing about men’s bodies and mansex, and that isn’t suitable for kids or the sexually modest.)

Just when I’d fallen to musing that the net was bringing me nothing fresh from the bounty of its homoerotic resources to be thankful for this Thanksgiving — both men’s premium underwear companies that traffic in borderline-hardcore images in their ads and also gay porn companies that offer every manner of flat-out celebratory mansex in theirs were doing replays of their best hot stuff from past years, all of which I’d already posted about here — just then, Lucas Entertainment (high-end gay porn guys) came up with a totally new hot item, released just three days ago, for its Black Friday sale; and almost at the same time, Tim Evanson posted to Facebook with J. C. Leyendecker’s cover for the Saturday Evening Post for Thanksgiving 1928, framed as a bit of history-clash humor (Puritan soldier, weapon on his shoulder, and a modern warrior, a college football player in a holiday game, confront each other aggressively) but also giving off a cascade of homoerotic undertones.

Both the Leyendecker cover (below) and one of the ads (also below) for Lucas’s Barebacking in Public — in which (according to the publicity) “Dan Saxon pounds Gabriel Phoenix on Fire Island”, before they go on to flip roles — turn crucially on the intense content of the men’s facial expressions. These are gifts.

All thanks to HomoEros, who rules the domain of intimate connection, affectional and sexual, between men, and has granted us these gifts.

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Thanksgiving sacks of cement

November 28, 2019

A Thanksgiving cartoon by graphic designer Matt Reedy, requiring crucial background knowledge for understanding:


(#1) From Reedy’s pages of Den of Apathy prints (riffs on popular culture) on Etsy: WKRP “As God As My Witness, I Thought Turkeys Could Fly” (an 11×17 print is on sale there for $15)

A completely wordless cartoon (just the helicopter, the plummeting turkeys, the cityscape in the background) might not have worked, but “Cincinnati” is enough to make it the composition into a funny cartoon — if you know the background. “Thanksgiving” would work instead (with the same proviso). Or both: “Thanksgiving in Cincinnati”.

If you know Reedy’s title, you have even more of the story, but you still need to know how all these parts fit together, though you might reasonably infer that someone has dropped turkeys from a helicopter in the belief that they could fly, and that’s funny in itself. For the whole story, WKRP is crucial.

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Annals of art: statues of the iron prince

November 26, 2019

Today’s Zippy takes us to Alma AR, where Popeye rules with cans of spinach:

(#1)

This Popeye, who claimed to be the true Popeye and to be carved of wood (all others — especially the one in the cartoons — being mere dissemblers, pretenders, imitators), this grotesque figure, in fact of fibergass over papier-mâché, once stood tall in Alma AR, but has apparently wandered off, to be superseded by a harder, even more massive, Prince Popeye (invigorated by green iron but actually composed of bronze), the new lord of the Ozark Empire of Chenopodia.

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Annals of art: Thiebaud’s Thanksgiving turkey

November 26, 2019

On the cover of the 11/25 issue of the New Yorker, Wayne Thiebaud’s “Stuffed”:

(#1)

Accompanied by a cover story by Françoise Mouly from 11/18/19, a charming interview with the 99-year-old artist.

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The chimera of Faneuil Hall

November 13, 2019

Yesterday’s Zippy takes us to the Boston waterfront and a piece of remarkable antic public art:

(#1)

A chimera — a composite of parts of a Boston lobster (those claws!) and parts of Mickey Mouse (all the rest, but especially the ears), let’s portmanteau him Lobstickey Mouse — who stood for a couple of years by Faneuil Hall on the Boston waterfront.

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News at the Miss Albany

October 29, 2019

Yesterday’s Zippy takes us to a historic diner in Albany NY and its notifications boards:


(#1) Note the parochial character of the messages: bulletins about the diner’s offerings

The real diner’s interior:


(#2) From the diner’s last day of service, posted 2/17/12 on the All Over Albany site

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High steel Escher

October 25, 2019

A brief celebration of one of my favorite cartoons, on the occasion of a reproduction of it being installed in the Empire State Building. Rob Leighton’s Escher on high steel:

I’m trying to imagine the blueprints. Also, of course, how the workers got up there in the first place.

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Grammar and gardening

October 24, 2019

From Jack Hoeksema recently, a note about this 1650 painting in the National Gallery (London), “Allegory of Grammar”, by Laurent de La Hyre:


(#1) A young woman watering plants / Grammar, the first of the Seven Liberal Arts, personified, nurturing young minds

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11k little bears, done in by the Huns

October 21, 2019

Today’s saintly tale, thanks to a reminder from Anonymous 4, advertising their wonderful album 11,000 Virgins: Chants for the Feast of St. Ursula (by Hildegard von Bingen).

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