Archive for the ‘Sarcasm and irony’ Category

Yesterday’s hot guy

January 28, 2017

posted on him here in a BE FUCKING POLITE t-shirt, giving us the finger. In that posting, I hadn’t identified the model, but now ace mandentifier David Preston has named Daniel M. Sheehan, of the L.A. men’s fashion firm Sheehan & Co., as the hunky silver fox in the photo. As it turns out, the aggression in that photo was entirely mock aggression: Sheehan the man is sweet, earnest, and funny — there are videos on the company’s site — and he describes the photo as “ironic”. Here’s another version of the shirt, fingerless and affectionate (a single red rose symbolizing love), but still oxymoronic (though now the context moves the intensifier fucking in the direction of sexual fucking: towards ‘be fucking politely’):

(#1)

Sheehan seems to have a huge following of women (who presumably fantasize about doing him) and a substantial following of straight men (who presumably fantasize about being him) and a huge following of gay men like me (who can indulge in both fantasies). The FUCKING shirts can be read as aimed at any one of these audiences, or of course all of them.

Now, since I find the man physically attractive and his presentation of self (some compound of macho and gay) equally attractive, six more photos of him and his work.

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Gentle mockery

May 11, 2016

Today’s Calvin and Hobbes:

Calvin in one of his roles, as a 6-year-old boy in love with the clash of titans and destruction on a massive scale (he also has his moments of knowledge and opinion beyond his years, about art, for instance), and Hobbes in one of his roles, as an affectionate older-brother figure (he also has his moments as a tiger with tigerish instincts and as a playmate for Calvin). But what is Hobbes’s gently mocking speech act here.

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Morning: The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades

December 26, 2015

This morning, this name of a song, which just bubbled up out of nowhere. (No, this is not a bright and sunny day.)

You can listen to the song here.

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Four cartoons

January 21, 2014

A sudden avalanche of linuistically interesting cartoons, on a variety of topics.

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Zippirony

December 22, 2013

Yesterday’s Zippy:

First, there’s the morphological form dehumorized, an entirely transparent use of English derivational morphology (‘without humor, with humor removed’), but novel. But then there’s the ironic note that suppressing all humor is itself humorous.

Briefy noted: sarcasm in the Court

October 12, 2013

A letter in the New York Times yesterday, from Ailan Chubb of Rio Rancho NM:

That the humor during oral arguments before the Supreme Court is deserving of analysis is interesting (“A Most Inquisitive Court? No Argument There,” by Adam Liptak, Sidebar column, Oct. 8).

I have noticed that sarcasm by one or more justices, and principally by Justice Antonin Scalia, is the prevailing sort of humor. Yet sarcasm is a known element of unfair fighting. It is destructive and takes away focus from the arguments. Some authorities call sarcasm anger couched as humor.

Given how certain justices use sarcasm in oral arguments, one would think that there is no backlog of cases in the courts; that certain justices have little respect for the enormous amount of tax dollars these proceedings cost; and that they aren’t mindful of the effect these decisions have on ordinary people’s lives.

Sarcasm, like verbal teasing, has a considerable aggressive component.

In quotation marks

July 18, 2013

Today’s Dilbert, with Dogbert weaseling words to the boss:

The strip has Dogbert speaking in quotation marks, indicating a prosody that sets off the word storage, suggesting that the word is not to be taken literally: it’s in what we’ll call storage, but nothing is actually stored there (a message that is close to ironic or sarcastic).

Define “collaborate”

June 8, 2013

Today’s Dilbert:

Alice gives a witheringly sarcastic response to the pointy-headed boss, supplying a definition of collaborate that unpacks some of the connotations of the word for her. The boss then puts her down by maintaining that she is uncooperative (she ought to “play well with others” by collaborating with Larry), and she counters by pulling out the gender assumptions in the boss’s observation (women are supposed to be cooperative and collaborative, men are supposed to be assertive and confident).

whoopee cushion

June 4, 2013

I was moved yesterday to wonder about the whoopee cushion, its history, and the various names for it. In particular, I mused that there would be no good way to predict what the thing is called in English, given a description of it; fart cushion would be the obvious candidate.

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Idiomaticity

May 18, 2013

Today’s Pearls Before Swine:

The idiom golden throat ‘a widely admired singing or speaking voice’ is both metonymic (throat for ‘voice’) and metaphorical (golden ‘like gold in value’), but it’s complex enough that someone could not see that. Rat, of course, just turns things to his own ends.

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