Archive for the ‘Art/lit/music/film’ Category

SuperCamp penguins

October 22, 2016

I’m preparing to scan in a set of penguin-themed thoroughly XXX-rated collages in relatively large originals, but mixed in with these in my files are two entirely R-rated collages, SuperPenguin and Potpourri, which I’ll report on here.


Another Spanish lesson

October 21, 2016

Left out of my AZBlogX posting of the 19th, “Spanish lessons”, was this item (#11 in the set), decidedly homoerotic but not actually X-rated:

A Daddy-Boy scene, illustrating el papá.


Five sets of gay collages

October 19, 2016

Continuing to scan in (mostly) XXX-rated collages, set by set. Five more AZBlogX postings in the last three days, in a variety of styles and tones:

10/17/16: “Baskets of Joy”: 2 sex-heavy collages based on a photo of a basket store

10/18/16: “ALL CAPS”: 11 collages, many powerfully sexual and elaborately staged, using a set of big all-caps letter stickers for their main texts

10/18/16: “Fossils on a field of purple”: 8 collages; background fossil images; lots of body dislays and man-man sex; texts from various sources and artfully arranged stickers

10/19/16: “French lessons”: 10 collages, in pairs, based on Tom of Finland and Bob Mizer images; silly pairings of word and defnition, whimsical animal stickers, but most collages with at least one significant dick in them

10/19/16: “Spanish lessons”: 10 homoerotic collages, most of them simple, and most of them homo-suggestive rather than explicit

… and his fruit was sweet to my taste

October 16, 2016

A return, after several years, to posting my collages on this blog and on AZBlogX (depending on their X-ratings). Two inaugural postings: one already on my X blog with five collages in the Bangers & Mash series, now one on this blog with two Sausage Tree collages (high phallicity, no actual phalluses):




Dress for success

August 15, 2016

Another item unearthed today: a collage of sorts (well, an altered poster) from 1998, amended by Chris Ambidge in 2000:

It’s all about clothing and displaying the body.


Pasta fazool

October 16, 2015

Some time back I was assauted by the Dean Martin recording of “That’s Amore”, a hymn to love that includes the ugly lines

When the stars make you drool just like a pasta fazool / That’s amore

The word drool just doesn’t belong in a song about love; nor for that matter does the line “When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie”.  And what’s pasta-and-bean soup / stew doing in there?

The song is a play on all things Italian-American, including Martin using an Italian-American accent in English (which came to him legitimately, from childhood), where the Italian in question is the language (with its accompanying peasant culture) of Italian immigrants to the US, that is, primarily the Neapolitan language (and its accompanying culture), of the Italian south, and not by any means something approaching standard Italian. Along with the linguistic features come the peasant foods of the south, in particular pizza and pasta e faglioli (Ital.) / pasta fasule (Neap.).


Morning name: La Bayadère

June 23, 2015

Yesterday’s morning name, for a ballet. From Wikipedia:

La Bayadère (en. The Temple Dancer) … is a ballet, originally staged in four acts and seven tableaux by French choreographer Marius Petipa to the music of Ludwig Minkus. La Bayadère was first performed by the Imperial Ballet at the Imperial Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia, on 4 February [O.S. 23 January] 1877. A scene from the ballet, known as The Kingdom of the Shades, is one of the most celebrated excerpts in all of classical ballet.

Today, La Bayadère is presented primarily in two different versions — those productions derived from Vakhtang Chabukiani and Vladimir Ponomaryov’s 1941 revival for the Kirov Ballet, and those productions derived from Natalia Makarova’s 1980 version for American Ballet Theatre, which is itself derived from Chabukiani and Ponomaryov’s version.

… Petipa’s La Bayadère … tells the story of the bayadère Nikiya and the warrior Solor, who have sworn eternal fidelity to one another.

Very brief excerpts from a Bolshoi performance here:

David Hockney

June 16, 2015

Having posted yesterday about, among other things, Pascal Blondeau’s photographic tribute to David Hockney and his pool paintings, I realized that although I’ve mentioned Hockney in passing several times, I haven’t properly posted about him, even during this exhibition of local interest:

From 26 October 2013 to 30 January 2014 David Hockney: A Bigger Exhibition was presented at the de Young Museum, one of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, showing work since 2002 and including Photoshop portraits, multi-canvas oils, iPad landscapes and digital movies shot with multiple cameras. (Wikipedia link)

Now to right that wrong.


Collage postings

January 2, 2015

Another set of Pages, with links to more collage postings. To the existing Page with academic collages (Collages: Academic), I have added two others: Collages: Miscellaneous, mostly with lesbian-related (but not X-rated) collages; and Collages: Gay, with gay-male-related (and mostly X-rated) collages.

No cultural clichés!

November 16, 2014

In a possibly apochryphal story, someone complains that they can’t appreciate Shakespeare’s plays because they’re so filled with clichéd expressions. Of course, those expressions were either innovations of Shakespeare’s or other figurative language spread through Shakespeare’s. If you come to works of art in a vacuum, with no sense of their cultural context, then even works of genius can seem banal.

Another example: a friend of mine who found Mozart’s music boring, because for him it was all generic “classical” music, only too familiar.

And now, another friend who (despite his attraction to action movies of many sorts) can’t appreciate classic Westerns, like Red River, because he feels they’re too predictable.

I’m sure there are other examples from other arts, though I can’t provide them from my own experience. Probably there are people who can’t appreciate Monet’s water lily paintings, or Charles Dickens’s novels, or John McPhee’s non-fiction books.