Archive for the ‘Names’ Category

Risible (faux-)commercial name

March 13, 2017

From a posting by Randy Murray to the Facebook page‎ “THE ERRORIST MOVEMENT – Correct grammar, with humour”, where he comments, “apostrophes mean so much”:

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At first glance, this ad would seem to fall into four big topic areas on this blog: dubious commercial names; It’s All Grammar; vulgar slang; and phallic play (in particular, word play). To which I add: the conventions on the form of hashtags, e-mail addresses, and web addresses (URLs). But first, I have to tell you that this particular Dick’s Pizza is a fabrication.

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bombogenesis

March 12, 2017

The weather forecast for the US Northeast is dire, calling for a fierce late winter storm, with plenty of snow. Map from the Northeast Weather site on Facebook (link from Eleanor Houck, who lives in the Reading area in southeastern Pennsylvania, right in the red zone):

In some of the forecasts, Eleanor came across the colorful technical term bombogenesis, suggesting a “weather bomb”. New to her, and to me, but it’s been around for a while.

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News for penises: a friend request

March 11, 2017

(Well, yes, men’s bodies, sex talk, and man-man sex. Not for kids or the sexually modest.)

A friend request on Facebook, from someone using the name Nick Petersucker (some time ago, FB obviously ceased to care a great deal about its policy of insisting that posters use their real names; now, all sorts of remarkable names come past me on FB). His profile picture, a selfie of someone, first posted in 2012:

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Spring bulbs

March 9, 2017

… and other flowers. The plants come into bloom on a schedule that’s some complex of day length and temperature. Locally we’ve been having stretches of late cold weather (“patchy morning frost in low-lying areas”, the weather forecasts will say), so some plants are on the late side. Out my front door: the calla lilies are just now opening up, and the Victorian box — Pittosporum — hasn’t yet come into fragrant bloom. (For enthusiasts of resembloid composites: calla lilies aren’t lilies (Lilium), and Victorial box isn’t any kind of box (Buxus); see my 3/17/12 St. Patrick’s Day posting.) But the first narcissus bloomed in January, and a visit with Juan Gomez to Palo Alto’s Gamble Garden on Tuesday confronted us with great swaths of blooming narcissus, of many cultivars, as well as tulips, grape hyacinths, and snowdrops.

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Body works, Part II: Mytilid Matters

March 5, 2017

(Some frank discussion of the female body, with a racy food photo. Use your judgment.)

A photo on Facebook from John Dorrance, with the comment “These things are obscene”:

Well, they’re striking vaginal symbols (vulvar symbols would be more accurate anatomically, but just think of this commonplace use of vagina as metonymic).

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On the day

March 4, 2017

This is my grand-daughter Opal’s birthday (an excellent day) and also National Grammar Day (a very odd occasion), always together on this date, and this year, it’s also a Saturday and the fourth day of Lent. On this date in Australia (which was yesterday here), the 2017 Sydney Mardi Gras Parade (billed as an LGBTI — I for intersex — pride celebration) happened. Yes, the Mardi Gras Parade was held four days after Shrove Tuesday  and on a Saturday — Mardi Gras the religious holiday, celebrated secularly as the culmination of a festival season, a day of wild indulgence before the religious season of Lent, a long period of “prayer, doing penance, repentance of sins, almsgiving, atonement, and self-denial” (link) before the Easter season.

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Name fame

March 3, 2017

Still going back in my blog queue, now to a 12/15/16 NYT piece by Sam Roberts, (in print) “Increasingly, Surnames Are Latino, Census Says” and (on-line) “Hispanic Surnames on the Rise in U.S. as Immigration Surges”:

Taylor and Thomas are out. Lopez and Gonzalez are in. Six of the 15 most common surnames in the United States were of Hispanic origin in 2010, compared with four of 15 in 2000 and none as recently as 1990.

Smith, Johnson, Williams, Brown and Jones still remain the most common of 6.3 million last names reported in 2010, according to a Census Bureau analysis released on Thursday, but Garcia had edged up from eighth to sixth, closing in on Jones and Brown. (Rounding out the Top 10 were Miller and Davis.)

The ascendancy of the Hispanic names reflects both the surge of immigrants from Latin America over the last several decades and the fact that Hispanic surnames tend to be less diverse (a disproportionate 16 percent of Hispanic people have one of the top 10 Hispanic names).

Garcia and Rodriguez were joined in the Top 10 in 2010 by Martinez (the 15 most popular also include Hernandez).

“I hope it means that more people named Gonzalez and Garcia and Hernandez become civic leaders and teachers and become the future of America,” said Eric Gonzalez, the acting Brooklyn district attorney.

Most of the surnames increasing fastest among the highest-ranking 1,000 are Asian (Zhang was up 111 percent, followed by Li, Ali, Liu and Khan) and three of the 15 fastest growing were Hispanic (led by Vazquez, which was up 63 percent, followed by Bautista and Velazquez).

Among those 15, Patel proliferated by 58 percent, and also by the most numerically, nearly 250,000.[The name Patel is primarily from Gujarat, but there are also Patels from surrounding areas.]

Summary of the data:

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To welcome the name Lopez to the #12 slot (in 2010, remember), here are two Lopezes from pop culture: Jennifer and George:

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Jennifer Lynn Lopez (born July 24, 1969), also known as JLo, is an American singer, actress, dancer, fashion designer, author, and producer. (link)

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George Lopez (born April 23, 1961) is an American comedian and actor. He is known for starring in his self-produced ABC sitcom George Lopez. His stand-up comedy examines race and ethnic relations, including Mexican American culture. (link)

Family names

March 3, 2017

(Hunky guy in skimpy swinsuits, mildly racy talk. That’s all.)

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Born
SwimWear GrabCock,
Of a long-ago line of
Poultry thieves,
In an eccentric
Underwear-oriented
Family, with his
Brother JockStrap and his
Sister SportsBra,

SwimWear traded his natal
Surname in for
GrabBag,
Because it wasn’t necessarily
Sexual, and he liked to
Scratch his balls

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Five contorted cactuses

March 2, 2017

Continuing the recent theme of cacti and succulents on this blog (focused on plants that are either beautiful or phallic): five contorted or convoluted plants — all of them, apparently, originating in genetic sports of more everyday organisms).

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A codgerie of shaggy men

March 1, 2017

Among the stand-out cactuses at the Stanford cactus and succulent garden these days: the wonderfully named Cephalocereus senilis (very roughly, ‘old man candle-head’). One of a large set of stand-up, erect cactuses that pretty much inevitably count as phallic symbols — in this case, with the added attraction of lots of wispy white hair. A codgerie of shaggy men:

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