Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

POP with Poe

July 18, 2017

Another POP (phrasal overlap portmanteau) from Hilary Price in today’s Rhymes With Orange:

(#1) Edgar Allan Poe + po’ boy

The Raven flies to New Orleans.

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Surreal juxtaposition

July 15, 2017

One of Dan Piraro’s specialties in his Bizarro strip. Today’s strip brings Pinocchio to the beach, offering to exchange favors:

  (#1)

(If you’re puzzled by the odd symbols in the cartoon — Dan Piraro says there are 2 in this strip — see this Page.)

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Words on a wall

July 8, 2017

The latest xkcd (#1860):

(#1)

That’s Lewis Carroll’s Humpty Dumpty on that wall, discoursing on semantics as in Through the Looking-Glass. The stand-in for the baffled Alice in the book is the aggressively disputatious Science Girl of xkcd.

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Another prohibition on tipping

July 4, 2017

Yesterday’s posting on cow-tipping and related matters distinguished two verbs tip, played with in a cartoon by Daniel Beyer:

(1) give (someone) a sum of money as a way of rewarding them for their services

(3) overbalance or cause to overbalance so as to fall or turn over

and provided a joke sign prohibiting cow-tipping. There are of course also NO TIPPING signs, usually in restarants, prohibiting gratuities.

Now Benita Bendon Campbell reminds me of NO TIPPING signs in the UK that often baffle American visitors because they appear along roads, in places where gratuities would seem to be irrelevant. There are variants that show that a third verb tip is at issue here, one related to the

noun tip: British a place where trash is deposited; a dump. (NOAD2)

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O Canada! Au Canada: le huard!

July 1, 2017

Today is Canada Day, the 150th, and also the 30th anniversary of the Canadian dollar coin, the loonie (le huard):

(#1)

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Poems About Sluts

June 13, 2017

(Until the last section, this posting is mostly about silliness. The last section, however, descends to talk of men’s bodies and mansex in street terms, so is not for kids or the sexually modest. I’ll insert a warning when this material is imminent.)

Passed on in Facebook by Michael Palmer, this preposterous book cover:

(#1)

Yes, of course, a hoax. And appeared as such in a volume entitled Bad Little Children’s Books: KidLit Parodies, Shameless Spoofs, and Offensively Tweaked Covers. Then there’s the real book whose cover was tweaked to yield #1.

Beyond all that, we could take the title of #1 at face value and celebrate sluts and sluthood.

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Pride Time #1: the pink and the purple

June 2, 2017

Now that we’re into Pride Month, I’m overwhelmed with offers of relevant postings. I’ll start with some plants with flowers in the gay colors pink and purple, mostly purple today (with lavender for another day), including the wild pansy, aka Johnny-jump-up and tickle-my-fancy.

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Atypical Seuss

May 30, 2017

Two atypical books by Dr. Seuss — one for children, but about alphabets (On Beyond Zebra!); and one for adults, though in Geisel’s usual children’s-book format (You’re Only Old Once! A Book for Obsolete Children).

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Write like the wind

May 16, 2017

A few days ago on Facebook a friend despaired of ever getting his Master’s thesis written, and others chimed in with reassurances and encouragement. Somewhat bizarrely, I was reminded of something I wrote to the newsgroup soc.motss back in May 1996: a recollection of a radio dramatization of Ouida’s romantic adventure novel Under Two Flags (set in the Algerian desert), with a character who cries out at a crucial moment.:

My name is Cigarette, and I can ride like the wind!

And so she can. Meanwhile, I slightly revised the quotation, to:

My name is N, and I can write like the wind!

A mantra for the frustrated writer.

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Closets

May 4, 2017

Two recent items focused on gay men in the closet, though in two quite different ways: Dominic Dunne (1925-2009), the subject of a recent biography (Money, Murder, and Dominick Dunne: A Life in Several Acts by Robert Hofler); and James Beard (1903-1985), the subject of a recent documentary film (America’s First Foodie: The Incredible Life of James Beard). Dunne, who died 40 years after Stonewall, nevertheless spent a lifetime cringing in the closet. Beard, who died only 15 years after Stonewall, was an exuberantly gay man to everyone who knew him, but his acquaintances and employers and the media built a protective closet around him, one that he decided to break out of publicly only at the end of his life — so that the world was robbed of an example of a gay man of great talent, living a rich, full life. (Dunne was, to my mind, no kind of model of how to live a life.)

For what it’s worth, neither man was flagrantly flamboyant, but I pegged them both the first time I saw them talking about their lives and work.

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