Archive for the ‘Conversion’ Category

More piggery

February 26, 2017

Yesterday on nipples, a further adventure with the sexual snowclonelet X pig — in particular, nipple pig, nippig, titpig, referring to a man who is enthusiastically into papillary stimulation with other men, giving or getting. This has now led me to other, non-sexual, instances of the snowclonelet, as in these occurrences of the food-enthusiast (rather than sex-enthusiast) snowclonelet ice cream pig:

(#1)

(#2)

(more…)

bro-verbs

January 29, 2017

On ADS-L recently, some discussion of verbings of the noun bro: to bro down, to bro it up, to de-bro. It started on the 27th with Jon Lighter reporting on a recent occurrence of bro down ‘become (male) friends’ on the Fox TV show Sleepy Hollow, in the episode “Heads of State”:

Now that we’re neighbors, we can bro down, hang out, Chill-doh Baggins.

(more…)

Queens & Cowboys

January 2, 2017

A documentary I watched recently:

“Queens & Cowboys: A Straight [that is, ‘full, complete’] Year on the Gay Rodeo” chronicles a complete season of the International Gay Rodeo Association (IGRA). (site link)

(#1)

cover: Wade Earp on horseback

(more…)

One more SquirtJet item

November 30, 2016

(In the seminal-ejaculation zone, so not to everyone’s taste.)

It started with a report on ADS-L from Wilson Gray thst Urban Dictionary had an entry for spray and pray conveying (of males) ‘engage in unprotected sex’. I haven’t found that entry, but this one’s close:

spray and pray: have sex with a lady w/ no protection and pray for no children. OMG i just fucked that bitch and left a load. I pray there are no little hommies to become of this. by BamMaster April 14, 2003

The expression has the ejaculatory V spray, a metaphorical usage ultimately grounded in (a) a V of liquid flow (intrans. The water sprayed onto the deck. trans. We sprayed the water onto the deck.), extended to (b) a V denoting a flow of bullets from a submachine gun, assault rifle, or the like; (c) a V denoting specifically a flow of urine from a penis; (d) a V denoting specifically a flow of semen from a penis; (e) a V denoting the dissemination (spread or distribution) of information from some source.

To the Vs in (a)-(d) there correspond product or result Ns spray; sexual spray is then a SquirtJet item like spurt, shower, squirt, jet, spew in a posting of mine yesterday.

Meanwhile, the whole expression spray and pray refers to indiscriminate or unconstrained spraying (in one of the senses (b)-(e)) accompanied by a merely hopeful or wishful attitude towards the consequences or results of the spraying.

(more…)

Face work

November 27, 2016

(About semen and sex acts and facial expressions and slang and syntax — but, yes, semen is central to the posting, and there’s a lot of talk about sex acts in very plain terms. Only one photo, but it might make some people uneasy. So probably not for children or the sexually modest.)

Over on AZBlogX, a sale ad suggesting that the Lucas porn studio could supply you with a high-protein dessert for Thanksgiving: a splash of semen on your face. Lick and savor.

#1 there shows a man with a cumface, the result of a (cum) facial, the cum / jizz / spunk / cream / spooge supplied via the quite substantial cock also shown in the photo. On AZBlogX there are six more guys who’ve been facialed, who’ve gotten a facial (from a shooter), been given a facial (by a shooter), whose faces have been jizzed / spunked / creamed / spooged (by a shooter).

(more…)

Annals of verbing (and poetic meter)

October 31, 2016

(Some vulgar sexual slang from the world of gay sex, but nothing beyond that.)

More drawers of my files moved from Staunton Ct. to Ramona St. (and into the oaken desk there). Almost all academic files, but the drawers contained a few surprises, like two gay porn magazines from early 2001, in particular the Torso from February of that year, with the friction fiction “Fire-Station Stud: Italian Muscleman Starts a Fire” by a prolific writer of such stories, “Bearmuffin”. The teaser insert in the story:

Two points here: the verbing of the noun spunk ‘semen’ and the poetic form of the insert’s text, which is perfect iambic pentameter (with the bonus of the internal half-rhymes spunked … trunk and between … tree).

(more…)

Word times: two Ruthies, three Psychs

June 24, 2016

Annals of lexical confusions and innovations. Two word problems from Ruthie in the cartoon One Big Happy (two recent strips), a word confusion and two innovations from the tv show Psych.

(more…)

binge-bingeing

May 7, 2016

The wonderful creation of Pierce in Zits:

binge-bingeing is the PRP form of a verb to binge-binge, which is an instance of one or the other of two different compound V constructions of the form to N + V, whose semantic and pragmatic differences are small enough to ignore here.

(more…)

Down on the farm

May 5, 2016

(Mostly about plants, but there are some points of linguistic interest.)

Yesterday, talk between Juan Gomez and me about weeds, prompted by my revisiting a wonderful gift from Steven Levine back in 2011 (posted about here on 7/6/11): Farm Weeds of Canada (2nd ed. 1923; 1st ed 1909), edited by George H. Clark, illustrations by Norman Criddle (Department of Agricuture, Dominion of Canada). More on the book and its excellent illustrations in a later posting; here the topic is two questions from Juan: What’s your favorite weed? What’s your least favorite weed?

Not easy questions, especially because each asks for just one plant, though a reasonable person might have several candidates. Then there’s the question of what counts as a weed; the Farm Weeds book isn’t just about plants growing where they’re not wanted (a common definion of weed), it’s about pest plants growing where they’re not wanted; any number of plants thrive as weeds in waste and disturbed places without giving grief — the little (scarlet) pimpernel, Anagallis, for instance (disussion in a 9/6/15 posting here) — and any number of lawn or garden escapes are in fact plants growing where they’re not wanted (escaped lawn grasses can easily become pests, in fact), but people don’t call them weeds (their ornamental function seems to take precedence). Finally, most weeds, even very invasive ones, have their good points: the common oxalis in these parts has lush green clover-like leaves and gorgeous yellow flowers, but it’s terribly invasive; poison ivy is dreadful, but its glossy leaves are handsome, and they turn bright red in the fall..

Having unloaded these reservations, I’ll still answer Juan’s questions: goldenrod good, dodder really really bad. With plates from Farm Weeds.

(more…)

icing

April 26, 2016

A Speed Bump cartoon from a little while ago, found on Pinterest:

The patient in the doctor’s office is — remember, this is Cartoon World — a gingerbread man, complaining of a sore knee. This sets things up for a play on the ambiguity of the verb form icing, related to either one of two verbs ice; one of them is related to the mass noun icing (in the U.S., parallel to frosting). From NOAD2 on this mass noun:

a mixture of sugar with liquid or butter, typically flavored and colored, and used as a coating for cakes or cookies

This substance mass noun icing and the verb ice ‘to decorate a cake with icing’ are in a very close synchronic relationship, so close that it’s hard to say which is basic and which derived (note: the verb could be back-derived from the noun); the history looks equally unclear, and the same relationships hold (in the U.S.) between the mass noun frosting and the verb frost (as in frost the cake). Somewhere in all of this is a metaphor relating the appearance of the cake-decorating substance to the appearance of accumulations of ice or frost.

The other verb ice, not well covered in the dictionaries I’ve looked at, is a at root a simple verbing of the noun ice referring to frozen water and meaning roughly ‘chill with ice’, but specialized in reference to ice therapy for sore muscles or joints. (I have joint problems all over the place, and so have cold packs to use for icing these joints.)