Archive for the ‘Alliteration’ Category

Penguin Pride

September 1, 2016

… at the Pilsner Inn (in San Francisco):

(Hat tip to Aric Olnes.)

Not only a penguin with a Pride flag, but a nicely alliterative tetrameter line:

Penguin Pride at the Pilsner Inn

(mostly trochaic). Or pentameter:

Penguin Pride on the Pilsner Inn Patio

(clearly dactylic).

Gang of five

June 28, 2016

Comics and cartoons pile up. Here are four recent ones from my regular feeds, plus a Perry Bible Fellowship (“The Offenders”) sent to me by Jason Parker-Burlingham. Before that, a Bizarro with the slow-snail cartoon meme; a One Big Happy with an attachment ambiguity; a Rhymes With Orange on reduplicated names (like mahi-mahi); and a massively alliterative Zippy.


(If you’re puzzled by the odd symbol in the cartoon — Dan Piraro says there’s just one in this strip — see this Page.)

The usual meme is about snails (with shells), but it works equally well for slugs (without shells).


Simplifying the example, it’s I sketched a model in the nude. There are two scopes for the modifier in the nude — as a sentential (or VP) adverbial (the scoping for clauses with intransitive verbs, like I sunbathed in the nude), attributing nudity to the referent of the subject; or as a modifier within the direct object NP (note the passive A model in the nude was painstakingly sketched by the life drawing class). The first speaker intends the second, narrower scope, but Ruthie understands the first, wider scope, in which the artist is nude.


English has a considerable number of names that are reduplicative in form, like the place name Bora Bora. Some of these are food names, like mahi-mahi and couscous. The diner is taking the reduplicative form to denote multiplicity (or extent), giving rise to a kind of back-formed noun, mahi or cous.


Bill Griffith loves to play with the sounds of words. Having started with Fairchild Semiconductor (the company name) used as a personal name, the first panel explodes with F alliteration, which continues in the other two panels — pared with T alliteration in the second panel, S alliteration in the third.

And then to cartoon sound words in Perry Bible Fellowship, which range from conventional to inventive:


Added later: More important, as commenter RF notes:

Note that Slur’s “problematic” fighting style results in sound effects that are racial slurs directed at his opponents.

This was clearly telegraphed by the name of the strip (“The Offenders”) and by the name of the central character (Slur). Somehow I missed this on a first reading. Many thanks to RF.


Another dubious name

June 10, 2016

Passed on from Facebook posters by way of Chris Waigl, this storefront, with comments from readers about the store name Kum & Go:

(Note the use of rhyme and alliteration in the follow-ups.)

Another chapter in the annals of dubious and unfortunate names on this blog. In this case, you might have thought that a double entendre was intentional, a bit of playful naming to catch your eye and stick in your memory. But the company’s official story maintains otherwise, so (apparently)  it’s only accidentally risible.


Ding Dong Deli

April 27, 2016

Today’s Zippy, which takes us to woodsy northern New Jersey (west of New York, east of Pennsylvania, south of Connecticut):

This is the alliterative Ding Dong Deli, a diner and shop, in Oak Ridge NJ (there is aso a Ding Dong Deli in Mahopac NY), naturally attractive to Zippy, who’s from Dingburg and who’s an enthusiast of Hostess snack products, especially Ding Dongs (see my 4/4/13 posting), as well as Ding Dong School and the song “Rama Lama Ding Dong”, both of which have been covered here.

Mayan comics and alliterative music

March 12, 2016

Recent e-mail from my old friend Larry Schourup with two very different offerings of interest: a piece about Mayan counterparts to modern comics, and a response to my 2/23/16 posting (on “Who is Silvia?”), which had a Schubert setting of Shakespeare, very alliterative, with a (Kurt) Moll performance of Mozart (from The Marriage of Figaro), also alliterative.


Briefly noted: note from a subculture

June 6, 2014

A business card (two-sided, mounted here on an ornamental card) from an establishment in British Columbia, picked up by a friend visiting there: a private  place for men to enjoy sexual connection. These range from the gay baths, for relatively short-term liaisons, to those that label themselves as hotels or resorts (some in urban locations, some rural), offering everything from tricking to vacations for couples. Hung Homo Homestay (despite the slangy alliterative name) is definitely at the high end.

I’ll eventually post some about male body types and tastes about them. Here I merely note that these men have exceptionally, indeed abnormally, developed musculature — not to everyone’s taste (think of it as ornamental rather than necessarily arousing), and certainly not found routinely at homo hook-up havens.

Five for Friday

May 18, 2014

Five items, several of which lead to more complex topics: a Harry Bliss cartoon that I caught, reprinted, in the Funny Times for May; a Zippy on art forgery; a One Big Happy with a kid eggcorn; a Zits with alliteration and rhyme (and the sexual marketplace); and a Rhymes With Orange on consonants and vowels.


The poetry of green tea

April 25, 2014

Among the many teas sold by Tazo (from South Seattle WA) are three green teas that my daughter got for me recently, to replenish my supplies. The company is into lush, poetic descriptions of its products — quite entertaining, if you’re in the right mood.

The descriptive material comes in two parts: one part characterizes the taste of a tea, the other is copy poetically evoking a scene or feelings associated with it. Sometimes I think these are cool, but often I think they’re just funny.


Krazy Kat

April 23, 2014

Fred Shapiro on ADS-L yesterday:

Since I am now working on the second edition of the Yale Book of Quotations, let me ask, were there any particularly memorable catchphrases or one-off quotations from the Krazy Kat strip?

John Baker replies:

Well, Krazy Kat referred to Ignatz Mouse as “Li’l Dollink,” and the strip’s captions referred to Joe Stork as “purveyor of progeny to prince & proletarian.”  I don’t know if either of those really qualify as particularly memorable.

KK’s Dollink (for Darling): it’ sounds like Yiddish-English, but it begins to look like KK’s dialect is sui generis.


Peanuts alliteration

January 21, 2014

Another Peanuts, this time with a pile of alliteration:

Who wouldn’t resent being called a tiny tot?

Meanwhile, the girls seem to be musically informed.