Graphic autobiography: Harvey Pekar

Another “graphic novelist” from the list in my posting “Comics books”: Harvey Pekar. A self-portrait:

From Wikipedia:

Harvey Lawrence Pekar (… October 8, 1939 – July 12, 2010) was an American underground comic book writer, music critic, and media personality, best known for his autobiographical American Splendor comic series. In 2003, the series inspired a well-received film adaptation of the same name.

Frequently described as the “poet laureate of Cleveland,” Pekar “helped change the appreciation for, and perceptions of, the graphic novel, the drawn memoir, the autobiographical comic narrative.” Pekar described his work as “autobiography written as it’s happening. The theme is about staying alive, getting a job, finding a mate, having a place to live, finding a creative outlet. Life is a war of attrition. You have to stay active on all fronts. It’s one thing after another. I’ve tried to control a chaotic universe. And it’s a losing battle. But I can’t let go. I’ve tried, but I can’t.”

… Pekar’s friendship with Robert Crumb led to the creation of the self-published, autobiographical comic book series American Splendor. Crumb and Pekar became friends through their mutual love of jazz records when Crumb was living in Cleveland in the mid-1960s. Crumb’s work in underground comics led Pekar to see the form’s possibilities, saying, “Comics could do anything that film could do. And I wanted in on it.” It took Pekar a decade to do so: “I theorized for maybe ten years about doing comics.” Pekar laid out some stories with crude stick figures and showed them to Crumb and another artist, Robert Armstrong. Impressed, they both offered to illustrate, and soon Pekar’s story “Crazy Ed” appeared in Crumb’s The People’s Comics, and Crumb became the first artist to illustrate American Splendor. The comic documents daily life in the aging neighborhoods of Pekar’s native Cleveland. The first issue of American Splendor appeared in 1976.

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