Dr. Miles’ Nervine

From Chris Ambidge in the mail yesterday, a version of this vintage ad:

A little searching pulled up another vintage ad for Nervine, one with more copy:

(For a wonderful collection of vintage ads for patent medicines containing cocaine, heroin, barbiturates, chloroform, etc., look here.)

(Yes, sometimes it’s Dr. Miles’ Nervine, with an apostrophe, and sometimes Dr. Miles Nervine, without, but never, apparently, Dr. Miles’s Nervine. When I heard radio ads for the stuff as a child, I thought for a while that the doctor’s name was Miles Nervine and that the medicine was named for Dr. Nervine.)

The active ingredient in Nervine was bromide. From a medical site:

Excerpt: “Bromide was once used as a sedative and an effective anticonvulsant, and until 1975 it was a major ingredient in over-the-counter products such as Bromo-Seltzer™ and Dr. Miles’ Nervine™. Bromism (chronic bromide intoxication) was once common, accounting for as many as 5–10% of admissions to psychiatric hospitals. Bromism is now rare, although bromides occasionally are used to treat epilepsy. Bromide is still found in photographic chemicals, as the bromide salt or another constituent of numerous medications, in some well water, in bromide-containing hydrocarbons (eg, methyl bromide, ethylene dibromide, halothane), and in some soft drinks containing brominated vegetable oil. Foods fumigated with methyl bromide may contain some residual bromide, but the amounts are too small to cause toxicity….”

From the various bromide substances came bromide used for a sedative containing bromide, especially potassium bromide, and from that came metaphorical uses (from OED2):

A person whose thoughts and conversation are conventional and commonplace. Also, a commonplace saying, trite remark, conventionalism; a soothing statement. slang (orig. U.S.).

As for the crab-prince ad copy, it’s an entertaining piece of puffery with a fondness for capitalization in unexpected places (as in the Nasty Pig PlaySheet ad here). And no, the ingredients in Nervine were not in fact “among the safest of effective medicines to calm the nerves” (see above).

9 Responses to “Dr. Miles’ Nervine”

  1. Chris Ambidge Says:

    how could you NOT want relief from nervousness or nervous exhaustion, sleeplessness, hysteria, headache, neuralgia, backache, pain, epilepsy, spasms, fits, and St. Vitus’ dance??

    Or, for that matter, to be reduced to the lobotomised calm of Mary with the noisy children?

  2. Tané Tachyon Says:

    This made me go watch The Babbitt and the Bromide again.

  3. arnold zwicky Says:

    From Chris Ambidge on the card that brought me the Dr. Miles’ Nervine ad, an account of Dr J. Collis Brown’s Chlorodyne:

    Unlike many Victorian era patent medicines, this stuff actually worked, against diarrhoea: I can see it now, a little hexagonal blue glass bottle, “one or two drops in a wineglassful of water.” And it did work. Now the two ingredients I remember are chloroform (!) and extract of opium. No wonder the authorities clamped down on it.

  4. Eclect(r)ic Oil « Arnold Zwicky's Blog Says:

    [...] I’m not sure I’d want to drink such a concoction, even if I had a really bad cold and sore throat. (Compare Dr. Miles’ Nervine, here.) [...]

  5. Nervine settled everybody’s nerves by sedating everyone | Thirty-Seven Says:

    [...] A. Dr. Mile's Nervine. Retrieved November 21, 2012 from [...]

  6. The Mushroom Says:

    I have both of those Nervine ads above and quite a few more, with a lot more coming as I find the Dr. Miles’ Almanacs and Jokebooks. See what I’ve got so far here in this Flickr set:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/thedamnmushroom/sets/72157629223959486/

  7. Deloris Says:

    Miles Nervine was wonderful! It really worked to calm my nerves and without any side effects whatsoever. Wish they still manufactured it.

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