Annals of miniaturization: Fantastic Voyage

(About a movie, rather than language.)

A follow-up to my posting on the miniature world of bonsai, about the preposterous (but entertaining) world of extreme miniaturization in the film Fantastic Voyage.

(#1)

From Wikipedia:

Fantastic Voyage is a 1966 science fiction film written by Harry Kleiner, based on a story by Otto Klement and Jerome Bixby. The film is about a submarine crew who shrink to microscopic size and venture into the body of an injured scientist to repair the damage to his brain. The original story took place in the 19th century and was meant to be a Jules Verne–style adventure with a sense of wonder. Kleiner abandoned all but the concept of miniaturization and added a Cold War element. It was directed by Richard Fleischer, and starred Stephen Boyd, Raquel Welch, Edmond O’Brien and Donald Pleasence. It was 20th Century-Fox’s final film to use the CinemaScope process.

Notable in this movie is Raquel Welch.

(#2)

From Wikipedia:

Raquel Welch (born Jo Raquel Tejada; September 5, 1940) is an American actress and singer. [Personal note: she’s one day older than I am.]

She first won attention for her role in Fantastic Voyage (1966), after which she won a contract with 20th Century Fox. They lent her to a British studio, for whom she made One Million Years B.C. (1966). She had only three lines in the film, yet images of her in the doe-skin bikini which she wore became best-selling posters that turned her into a celebrity sex symbol. She later starred in notable films like Bedazzled (1967), Bandolero! (1968), 100 Rifles (1969), and Myra Breckinridge (1970) [a controversial and much-panned film of the Gore Vidal book, in which she played the title character, who underwent a sex-change operation to become a woman].

(#3)

… Welch’s unique persona on film made her into an icon of the 1960s and 1970s. She carved out a place in movie history portraying strong female characters and breaking the mold of the submissive sex symbol.

Still a sex symbol, just not a submissive one.

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