Another PST/PSP = BSE

Found in a piece of umliterature yesterday, a reference to the writer’s (sexual) appetite being whet by some event (with PSP whet). The writing was fairly inept, so I didn’t collect it for my files, but I went on to find some other examples of PSP and PST whet (instead of whetted) on the net. On the order of thousands, so I wasn’t willing to dismiss them as inadvertent errors, especially when I’ve posted about parallel examples of non-standard PST/PSP = BSE.

A few examples:

[PSP] Now, there are many people who thrive on sale shopping. I however, dislike the hustle and bustle, the pushing and shoving and the frantic and generally needless consumerism. Having seen this particular item hanging on the rails a few months ago, my appetite was whet but the my size was nowhere to be seen. (link) [men’s fashion and style blog]

[PSP] I discovered it only half a year ago after hearing samples from it on the Internet that deeply impressed me. Of course my appetite was whet when I heard that Tunnelvision was signed by Massacre Records. (link)

[PST] It whet my appetite.
This was my first experience with the World War I on DVD, and it was a splendid introduction. (link)

[PST] The first episode was certainly strong & it whet my appetite for more. But what else would one expect from a series produced by Martin Scorsese & created by Terence Winter of The Sopranos? (link)

The parallels are PST/PSP text instead of texted (here) and PST/PSP breed instead of bred (here).

These are non-standard, but they’re right in line with a minor pattern of PST/PSP = BSE for monosyllabic verbs ending in /d/ or /t/ (bid, hit). And in the case of whet, there’s the very common spelling WET for WHET in whet one’s appetite (facilitated by the neutralization of /hw/ and /w/ for many speakers), combined with the fact that wet is a verb with alternative PST/PSP forms, wetted (completely regular) and wet (= BSE).


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