Archive for December, 2013

More for Xmas

December 16, 2013

An annual feature on this blog looks at Christmas music — from the sacred and serious to the trashy. Now John McIntyre, on his Baltimore Sun blog, invites opinion:

Tell me what Christmas music you find most loathsome.

McIntyre asks whether there is anything worse than “The Little Drummer Boy”. That song gets lots of other votes (including mine), but there are other candidates, like “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus”.

Xmas greetings

December 16, 2013

For the holiday season, this electronic Xmas card from my friend Mike McKinley, with a cheap but entertaining pun:

Genital plants

December 15, 2013

Two cards in succession in the Art of Instruction set: acorns and arums, both visually similar to human genitals, a fact recognized in some of the common names for the plants.

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Brief morphological notes

December 14, 2013

Three recent items: robophobic, fungineering, fracktacular. Three sightinga, among many for each of these.

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Quotations

December 14, 2013

Today’s Pearls Before Swine, the latest episode in a series of lemming gags — this time involving quotations:

 

Claus time

December 14, 2013

At this time of the year, there are innumerable plays on the Claus of Santa Claus; just think of the Santa Clause movies. And now there’s today’s Bizarro:

Fear of being in a confined space with Santa Clauses.

Friday cartoons

December 13, 2013

Absurdity in the comics pages: a Pearls Before Swine, a Sunday Morning Breakfast Cereal, and a Mister Hayden Comic.

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Generational humor

December 11, 2013

Today’s Zits:

The kids’ assumption here is that adults’ sense of humor is lame.

Invisible in Eureka

December 10, 2013

Today’s Zippy, with an invisible Zippy haunting Eureka CA (plus a note on the idiom bucket list):

(#1)

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More wild roses

December 10, 2013

Right after the eglantine rose (here) in the Art of Instruction cards came the dog rose:

(#1)

Rosa canina (commonly known as the dog rose) is a variable climbing wild rose species native to Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia.

It is a deciduous shrub normally ranging in height from 1–5 m, though sometimes it can scramble higher into the crowns of taller trees. Its stems are covered with small, sharp, hooked prickles, which aid it in climbing. The leaves are pinnate, with 5-7 leaflets. The flowers are usually pale pink, but can vary between a deep pink and white.

… The dog rose was the stylized rose of medieval European heraldry, and is still used today. (Wikipedia link)

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