Archive for the ‘Linguistics in the comics’ Category

The Church of Cheese

April 23, 2014

Thursday’s Pearls Before Swine:

Spreading the Gospel.

Krazy Kat

April 23, 2014

Fred Shapiro on ADS-L yesterday:

Since I am now working on the second edition of the Yale Book of Quotations, let me ask, were there any particularly memorable catchphrases or one-off quotations from the Krazy Kat strip?

John Baker replies:

Well, Krazy Kat referred to Ignatz Mouse as “Li’l Dollink,” and the strip’s captions referred to Joe Stork as “purveyor of progeny to prince & proletarian.”  I don’t know if either of those really qualify as particularly memorable.

KK’s Dollink (for Darling): it’ sounds like Yiddish-English, but it begins to look like KK’s dialect is sui generis.

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A Dilbert and a Rhymes

April 23, 2014

Cartoons today:

(#1)

(#2)

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Eating and nothingness

April 22, 2014

Today’s Zippy, on the emptiness of the Automats, with a nice pun in the title:

  (#1)

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Three for the day (Easter)

April 20, 2014

Today’s crop of cartoons includes a Bizarro, a Zippy, and a Mother Goose and Grimm:

(#1)

(#2)

(#3)

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Drew Dernavich

April 19, 2014

A posting by Mark Peters yesterday on the Psychology Today blog, “A Cartoon Maestro Talks Comedy: I interview New Yorker cartoonist Drew Dernavich”

One example of a language-related Dernavich cartoon:

 

Cat advises dog, using the omnipresent “no word for X” trope.

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Three for today

April 18, 2014

Three cartoons for today: a Dilbert, a Bizarro, and a Mother Goose and Grimm:

(#1)

(#2)

(#3)

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Paper vs. shiny rectangles

April 17, 2014

Today’s Zippy, on media of communication:

The incursion of electronic media into the domains of paper media is a recurrent theme in Zippy.

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Silly pun

April 16, 2014

In the most recent New Yorker (of April 21st), this droll cartoon by P. S.Mueller:

 

fairy / ferret.

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A (B + C)

April 16, 2014

Today’s Rhymes With Orange:

Phrasal overlap portmanteaus (POPs) come up on this blog again and again; they are expressions of the form A B C, where the three parts are all words or combining forms and where A + B and B + C are both words or phrases.

The Rhymes has a somewhat different way of combining three such elements: the first element is shared with each of the two others — factored out, as it were. That is, A + B and A + C are both words or phrases, in this case paranormal and paralegal, with the combining form para- factored out. The cartoon provides a context in which both expressions make sense.


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