Archive for the ‘Puns’ Category

Foodnited States

November 20, 2015

Through Facebook friends, this entertaining Mental Floss piece, “All 50 States Reimagined as Food Puns” by Rebecca OConnell:


If you had to assign one piece of food to represent each state, which item would you pick? For the good people at Foodiggity [which can be followed on Instagram], the answer is whatever is punniest.

Armed with a set of state-shaped cookie cutters and a love of wordplay, the team set out to make each state out of a food. The series, called The Foodnited States of America, features all 50 states.

The project came about when Foodiggity founder Chris Durso’s young son suggested they make states out of food. Durso almost dismissed the idea, until his son added, “But what if they like had funny names like New Pork or New Jerky?” Durso understood the value of a good pun and took on the task of shoving mashed potatoes into metal shapes.


Born out of breadlock

November 4, 2015

Today’s Rhymes With Orange, with a pun:

The cronut, a hybrid food with a portmanteau name. See section 1 (on the cronut) of my 5/30/13 posting about portmanteaus.

The morning after

November 1, 2015

Today’s Rhymes With Orange celebrates All Saint’s Day, the beginning of the Day of the Dead (in Mexico), and (this year) the Death of Daylight Time (in the U.S.):

It’s also the Feast of the Candy Pun.


Bread play

October 22, 2015

From Ann Burlingham, this Scott Milburn cartoon from 2012, with a pun avalanche, or punvalanche for short, of bread-related vocabulary: breadwinner, the verb loaf, (slice of) toast, Melba (toast), sourdough.


Some highlights follow.


Fidel of the Castro

August 23, 2015

The latest Funny Times arrived a couple days ago, and as usual there was a bunch of cartoons I laughed at, and some I wanted to post, but I couldn’t find usable copies or even identify the artists, despite trying several routes. Here’s my favorite of the set, a cartoon with no signature at all, and a style I didn’t recognize. So here, a description.

We see a burly Fidel Castro, with a smoking cigar in his hand and heavy-duty pecs on display, one notably pierced, plus metal stars in one pierced ear and on his epaulets. Titled as above: Fidel of the Castro, punning on his family name and the name of the San Francisco street that gives its name to The Castro, the gayborhood.

Leads to the cartoon would be much appreciated.

Language cartoon Wednesday

August 5, 2015

That would be today, with three language-related cartoons in my inbox: a Rhymes With Orange, a Mother Goose and Grimm, and a Bizarro:





cheesy pickup line

August 4, 2015

From George Takei on Facebook, this elaborate visual pun, presented like a captioned cartoon, with an entertaining disjuncture between the image and the caption:

The cheesiest pickup line ever

(Takei is scandously bad about crediting the sources of the things he posts — he just passes on things he comes across — so I have no idea who created this image or where it was originally posted.)

Three content words, each exhibiting crucial lexical ambiguity: the Adj cheesy, the N pickup, the N line.The whole thing is a N + N compound pickup line modified by the superlative of the Adj.



August 3, 2015

On John Kron’s Facebook page:


A little exercise in Yinglish.


Clown time

August 2, 2015

Today’s Rhymes With Orange:


A fine pun for a Sunday. But you do have to know about this:

“The Tears of a Clown” is a song by Smokey Robinson & the Miracles for the Tamla Records label subsidiary of Motown, originally released on the 1967 album Make It Happen. It was re-released in the United Kingdom as a single in September 1970, where it became a #1 hit on the UK singles chart. Subsequently, Motown released “The Tears of a Clown” as a single in the United States as well, where it quickly became a #1 hit on both the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B Singles charts. (Wikipedia link)

On YouTube:

The unflappable waitress

July 23, 2015

Today’s Bizarro:

Hun / hon.

The informal clipped form hon (for honey) as a term of address is stereotypically used, along with other pet names like the full honey, sweetie, dear(ie), and doll, by waitresses to their customers, in addition to the use of these as terms of endearment to genuine intimates. Many customers find the usage disrespectful and insulting, expressing intimacy in a situation where they see that deference to authority is called for.

(If you’re puzzled by the odd symbols in the cartoon — Don Piraro says there are 4 in this strip — see this Page.)


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