Archive for the ‘Language play’ Category

David Borchart

July 25, 2014

Earlier today: a David Borchart New Yorker cartoon with an entertaining ambiguity, #2 here. Borchart’s first appearance on this blog, though he’s a prolific cartoonist. Now another Borchart with some linguistic interest, plus one that just tickles me.

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Saturday monster puns

July 19, 2014

Through what I assume is fortunate accident, two cartoons this morning with puns on the names of movie monsters: a Bizarro with “Creature from the black legumes” (black beans) and a Mother Goose and Grimm with a psychoanalyst asking Godzilla about his Mothra (mother):

(#1)

(#2)

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A Sunday quartet

July 14, 2014

Four cartoons from yesterday’s crop: a Zippy in a nameless diner; a Doonesbury on rumors; a One Big Happy on the spread of expressions and speech styles from the media; and another Bizarro collection of puns. The strips:

(#1)

(#2)

(#3)

(#4)

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dorkage

July 12, 2014

Today’s Zits, with jocular morphology and some (Wurst-style) phallicity as well:

 

Jeremy for Weenie World!

Then there’s dorkage.

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Cartooning at the diner

July 6, 2014

Today’s Zippy, with Zippy and Griffy on cartoon styles and men’s fashions:

(#1)

And, in the third panel, a diner — which turns out to be identifiable, and leads us to some surprising places (Mercury Comets and English pubs):

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More holidays and anniversaries

July 4, 2014

Here in the U.S., it’s July 4th: Independence Day. So yesterday was, I suppose, Independence Eve. The 2nd was a notable anniversary, of the signing of the (U.S.) Civil Rights Act (of 1964, so that’s a 50th anniversary). And the 1st was Canada Day, to the north of us.

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Anemone pun

July 1, 2014

Today’s Mother Goose and Grimm:

Mistaken anemone for mistaken identity. Phonologically distant, but interpretable because mistaken identity is an idiom, a formulaic expression, which is, moreover, appropriate to the context of the cartoon.

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Ralph Steadman

June 6, 2014

I start with today’s Doonesbury (a replay from some years ago), continuing the story of Duke’s coming out of a drug coma:

(#1)

In the previous installment, Duke was hallucinating a talking lizard (right out of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which is where his cartoon character originates). Now he’s playing on the name of that book: Fear and Loathing at Macy’s Men’s Wear.

Time for some words on the amazing F&L and on its illustrator (the lizard source) Ralph Steadman.

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Briefly noted: note from a subculture

June 6, 2014

A business card (two-sided, mounted here on an ornamental card) from an establishment in British Columbia, picked up by a friend visiting there: a private  place for men to enjoy sexual connection. These range from the gay baths, for relatively short-term liaisons, to those that label themselves as hotels or resorts (some in urban locations, some rural), offering everything from tricking to vacations for couples. Hung Homo Homestay (despite the slangy alliterative name) is definitely at the high end.

I’ll eventually post some about male body types and tastes about them. Here I merely note that these men have exceptionally, indeed abnormally, developed musculature — not to everyone’s taste (think of it as ornamental rather than necessarily arousing), and certainly not found routinely at homo hook-up havens.

Briefly noted: two-language pun pairs

June 3, 2014

On May 31st, Xopher Walker, listening to a live opera broadcast on WFMT, groused about the tedium of Wagner’s Parsifal. Ned Deily noted a different radio broadcast (BR Klassik) of the more pleasing Die Entführung aus dem Serail (The Abduction from the Seraglio) by Mozart.  Extensive discussion of Parsifal and performances of it followed.

And then Michael Palmer produced this marvelous pair of puns on the name of the Mozart opera, one in German (playing on Ente ‘duck’ instead of the prefix ent- ‘separate, remove’), one in English (playing on duck instead of the Latinate root -duc- ‘lead’):

Die Enteführung aus dem Serail, aka the Abducktion from the Seraglio

(It’s all about the ducks.)

Applause for Palmer followed.

Palmer then wondered if there was an accepted term for this phenomenon – “puns in two languages that are translations of one another”. Not that I know of.

 


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